2000 Words in the English Language Frequently Mispronounced – Spoken by Carlton Hobbs

Look mate – if you don’t bleedin well get those goddam words aht the way them meant to be – I’ll ave-yah – fink oim jokin loike – don’t give me that zummerzit twang matey – standup straight – use those lungs – speak the BBC-english propaaahhh way – NOW !!  

2000 werdzzz – yep – you have it in full – 2000 words that MATTAHHH … split into categories ranging from let me see now – oh yeah A-Z that’s it ….   

A classic break-beat-groove for the post-industrial generation – just in time for the royal wedding – at which U-WILL-BE-JUDGED – by nothing more than how you pronounce abattoir !!  

This disc is THAT IMPORTANT !!!  TRUST ME – I’m a speech-therepist – ain’t oi!!

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Published in: on April 1, 2011 at 12:37 pm  Comments (8)  
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8 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. does it include the word “harassed”? it’s meant to be pronounced HAR-assed, but our yankee cousins have mangled it so it comes out as ha-RASSED!

    what is really alarming is that it has now become de riguer for the average tommy to pronounce the word in the american fashion!!

  2. I notice the average British “t” is softening, too, so “matter” is more and more pronounced “madder” a la North Americans.

    USA, USA, USA!

  3. “Matter” does not get a lookin – but “Marijuana” does – think me sampling only the A’s for the next Exotic Pylon mix – missed some better words !!

    “Harassed” is not there either – but – we do get hari-kari !!

  4. Oh yeah – and the disc – recorded in 1963 – is dedicated to SIR WINSTON S. CHURCHILL “Master of the English Language”….

  5. princeasbo :
    I notice the average British “t” is softening, too, so “matter” is more and more pronounced “madder” a la North Americans.
    USA, USA, USA!

    yes, we really are becoming the 51st state these days… or are we just another colony in the US globalisation programme (note i spell “programme” the ENGLISH way, not yankee-style “program” ha ha!)

    i have also noticed another highly irritating trait that has wormed its way into the english person’s diction: ending a sentence with the last word at a higher pitch than the others, as if it’s a question or something…!

    i gather this appalling habit comes courtesy of aussie soap operas, but sadly it’s not just confined to the unwashed – even my long-term friends who i thought would rise above that sort of thing have started talking in that manner to me… and i don’t think they’re even aware of it – aarrgghhh!!!

  6. btw asbo, has being “over here” (are you “over sexed and over paid” too ha ha) had any effect on your diction? – when you now speak to your fellow-american family and friends, do they accuse you of sounding like an english toff?

  7. I’ve made an effort not to be too Anglicised (note UK spelling) for fear of sounding affected. However, whenever I go home, people do say my accent has changed–for one thing, I say “chube” rather than “toob” for the London Underground. There are other examples, I’m sure.

    • princeasbo :
      I’ve made an effort not to be too Anglicised (note UK spelling) for fear of sounding affected. However, whenever I go home, people do say my accent has changed–for one thing, I say “chube” rather than “toob” for the London Underground. There are other examples, I’m sure.

      ha ha keep up the good work, but you’re swimming against the tide…

      another thing that really annoys me is when i enquire of young persons (raised on a diet of “friends” and “csi” no doubt) as to their health, i usually get the reply “i’m good”…

      still, it would seem that blue mink’s wish for a “great big melting pot” is being realised, if perhaps not in a way they imagined ha ha!

      actually, i have a small confession to make – in a way i admire the “septics” efforts to simplify the english language (which i believe due to it’s idiosyncracies is apparently one of the hardest languages to learn) by changing the spelling so it’s more phonetic thus more easily pronouncable (anglicize being a case in point)… but why didn’t they go the whole hog and spell it “anglisize”, and as for “centre”, surely logically it shouldn’t be “center” but “senter”? one thing that does puzzle me about american english: why do they only put one l in words like “travelling”? (i note the traveling wilbury’s are always spelt the american way, even on british releases…)

      just one more observation – i presume although canadians generally sound the same as americans (american-lite?), i think due to the fact that they’re still part of the empire (sorry, commonwealth), they may pronounce certain words in the english manner – i remembering watching an american edition of “whose line is it anyway” once and cannuck colin mochrie was mocked by the rest for pronouncing the word “route” as “root” like us brits do…


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