The Jacksons – Destiny b/w Blame It On the Boogie (Epic 12-6983) (1979)

MURRAY FOUND GUILTY OF MICHAEL JACKSON’S MANSLAUGHTER

Crowds Cheer As ‘King of Pop’ Comes Back To Life

(Los Angeles, CA) – Jubilent crowds gathered outside the Los Angeles Court of Criminal Justice cheered wildly as L.A. district attorney Jason Bexley announced that a criminal jury had found Dr. Conrad Murray guilty of the involuntary manslaughter of singer Michael Jackson. At the same time, Jackson himself emerged from Holly Terrace at Forest Lawn Memorial Park’s Great Mausoleum, alive and well, to announce the resumption of his “This Is It” series of concerts which had been postponed due to the self-styled King of Pop’s death.

On her way out of Monday’s court hearing where Murray received his guilty verdict, Jackson’s sister LaToya told the crowd of media and fans, “Justice has been done, which has brought Michael back to life and made everything alright.”

Fans have been alternately elated at Jackson’s return from the grave and calling for revenge to be meted out to Dr. Murray.

“I’m so glad Dr. Murray has been found guilty of killing our beloved Michael,” said one fan who’d travelled all the way from Columbus, Ohio to keep vigil outside the Los Angeles courtroom during the trial. “I hope he gets the f*cking chair.”

“I’ve already got tickets for MJ’s London O2 Arena shows,” he added.

The singer called for fans and media “to respect my privacy and that of my family at this exciting time of my post-post death.”

[NB: Jacksons 12″ bought in Sandwich, Kent chaz for a quid–excellent long version of “Boogie”]

Published in: on November 9, 2011 at 9:47 am  Comments (2)  

The Beach Boys – The SMiLE Sessions (Capitol 2580) (2011)

No, I didn’t get this at a charity shop or bootfair, but it has been much on my mind lately and I need to unburden my thoughts. Also, it is on 2Lp vinyl and purchased last week for a relatively thrifty £18.99 and so like a real politician I rationalise the rules to suit myself.
FRaGMeNTS

In alternate reality this is a Brian Wilson solo album and it is better….”Our Prayer” Gregorian invocation to th’ monaural SMiLE cult convocation, oh yes, across time (1600s-1960s) and space (AMERICA Atlantic to Pacific)….like countless beachfanboys before & since, Phillip & I Taylored a SMiLE in the early 90s on 4-track cassette, stitching bootleg off-cuts and legit Beach Boys tarted-up session material (e.g. the title track of Surf’s Up)….this is a thawed, flawed masterpiece taking flayed self-indulgence to new levels….mate Jaybird raised a digital SMiLE last year, extracting “Good Vibrations” on grounds that it constituted a different vibe–leaving a gap of Alfred E. Neuman proportions–I respectfully disagreed….if all were as focussed and good as “Vibrations” (or “Herondersurfullessenchimes”) and didn’t have all druggaddled dis-tractions, it would not be a flawed masterpiece, it would be a regular ol’ masterpiece….shock: Mike “Acid Alliteration” Love was wrong, not always….Brian manque Bruce, diminutive dentist Al, doomed devil Dennis, corpulent Carl made into a psychedelic barbershop sextet….Priore’s Dumb Angel fanzine anthology Look, Listen, Vibrate, SMiLE is shit, don’t buy it….elliptical tone poem….

….think of SMiLE as a Brian Wilson solo album, since, despite appearances/labels/four-color Jim Marshall booklet band photogs, it’s not Beach Boys music–some of it’s not even music….vinyl side 2 (out of 3–side 4 is made up of stereo mixes, etc.) is No. 1 side….Brian Wilson Presents SMiLE (2004) flows better than The SMiLE Sessions–but is a Listerine tribute album….some previously released Beach Boys versions of these songs are as good as (or better than) the ones here…a bit tinny and rinky dink, SMiLE was recorded in the mid-60s….at times, Van Dyke Parks’ lyrics are indistiguishable from published poetry (in the literary, self-conscious sense); at other times Van Dyke Parks’ lyrics are undistinguished (in their illiterary, self-conscious non-sense)….to any but SMiLE-anatics, SMiLE‘s attempts at humour are strained and unfunny after a couple listens or less (anyway Esquivel did it better and first)….I re-commend this album of re-occuring lyrical and musical themes


….easier compartmentalisation of his muse if this had be a Brian Wilson solo album….genius? I nearly cried….without filler, Pet Sounds is, and always will be BB’s best by an LA league….seriously, lose the jokey bits or at least make them shorter, sounding half-assed (though at least more wily than Smiley Smile)….”columnated ruins domino” = Greco-Roman god, heavenly sung even if Brian made a boulder that even he couldn’t lift and it broke his back ….this SMiLE needs braces, why not more tightly edited? not more incisor incisive? possibility producers consciously trying to avoid cracking “definitive” SMiLE, tho’ ’tis the de facto one….surprising number of cavities m-ss-ng here comparing 2004 edition and the one I helped compile….a LSD-25 riddled mind riddled easily made fiery paranoid by “Mrs. O’Leary’s Cow”….”Surf’s Up” should have closed the album down….

….but SMiLE sounds unfinish….

Published in: on November 8, 2011 at 12:56 pm  Comments (1)  

Sonny Boy Williamson – Down and Out Blues (Mono MAL 662) (1966)

Another blues re-issue by the estimable Marble Arch, and in virtually mint condish, but, as with the earlier Wolf collection, why did they delete two tracks from the original 1959 Checker version?

That this album was destined for literate aficionados is suggested by a liner note writer not shy of his literary allusions: W. Somerset Maugham and William Congreve rub shoulders with Bill Broonzy and the original Sonny Boy; words and phrases like “domestic discord”, “bewildered lovelorn” “taunting Jezebel”, “rueful”, “doltish”, “resignedly” and “cuckholdry” pepper the writing without sounding pretentious, just excited proselytising.

The music, it goes without saying, is marvelously jaunty Chicago electric blues featuring the man whose mama called him Rice Miller singing tremulously and punctuated by his distinctive harmonica playing.

Published in: on November 6, 2011 at 1:07 pm  Leave a Comment  

Buzz Rabin – Cross Country Cowboy (Elektra 75076) (1974)

Pull up a stool son and set a spell, lemme tell yew mah story…can I gitchoo a drank? Yew wanna cheroot?…well, it all started when that Pete Drake…huh? uh, he’s a producer and pedal steel player…he done some pickin’ on that All Thangs Mus’ Pass record album by Beatle George. Well, him and ol’ Ringo, who’s a-drummin’ on that record album, got to be best buds and ‘fore yew know it, they’s in Nashville makin’ another record album. Pete comes to me and says, “Buzz,” that’s my name by the way, Buzz Rabin, “Buzz,” he says, “We need a title track for this here record album.” And I goes, “How’s ’bout ‘Beaucoups [editor: pronounced boo-koos] of Blues’? That’s a good song for yer Limey friend to sang.” And dam’ if they didn’t up and do it.

Well, I starts to writin’ songs for ever’body in country music then and perty soon my buddy, Russ Miller, says you’s a perty good sanger, Buzz, you should be fixin’ to make yer own record album and git ol’ Pete to hep yew make it. So we did. Me and Pete decided to make it a concep’ album about life on the road with lil’ bits o’ what I calls “travelin’ music” in between the songs, you know, fast country stuff, with the title track openin’ the album an’ a reprise of it at the end, jus’ like Sgt. Pepper’s or Venus and Mars.  Yuh see, Ol’ Willie ditn’t make the firs’ country music concep’ album–Buzz Rabin did! Had him beat by a year, I did [editor: Willie Nelson’s Red Headed Stranger (1975)]. Heh, heh. Yeah, that Cross Country Cowboy‘s professionally performed, typical country music with the typical chord changes and typical subjec’ matter [editor: drinking, women, Jesus]. Took the pitchure on the cover at T.G.I. Friday’s [editor: true]. It’s a perty good album and I ain’t a bad singer, jus’ mebbe a little characterless. I wonder why I done never made another record or why I don’ have me an entry in Wikipedia. Anyhoo, I bought me some fancy suede duds and a leather vest with the record album advance, so it ain’t all bad.

Say, can I gitchoo anothuh drank?

[editor: I paid 50p for this US pressing of Cross Country Cowboy at an animal charity shop in Deal, Kent.]

Published in: on November 2, 2011 at 11:15 am  Leave a Comment  

Red Rhodes – Velvet Hammer In a Cowboy Band (CS-102) (1973)

As with cigarettes, whiskey, coffee and pumpernickel bread there’s something at first off-putting but ultimately compelling and satisfying about this instrumental record by pedal steel session guy Red Rhodes. From the beautifully shot, dynamically balanced and deliberately banal cover photograph by 70s lensman du jour Norman Seeff, Velvet Hammer is an unlikely record—kind of country, kind of jazz, kind of lounge—that puzzled even the players: “We didn’t know what we were doing when we made this album,” defiantly announces piano player David Barry on the back cover’s witty liner notes. He goes on, “We played together until we had what we wanted on tape or decided to try another song. We got confused, silly, drunk, depressed, high, mad, straight, stoned and joyful and it’s all on the record.” The fact that it was produced by Monkees’ oddball and proto-country rocker Mike Nesmith (and was released through Countryside, his vanity label) makes sense. Everyone I’ve played this record to has reacted the same way: first bemusement and then enthusiasm.

Picked up at the boot fair on Hythe Green, it’s the kind of record that makes crate-digging fun.

Published in: on November 1, 2011 at 7:59 pm  Leave a Comment  

Thrifty Vinyl vs. Exotic Pylon

Following on Ekolad‘s noisy broadside with musical compadre Bass Clef a couple weeks ago, there’s a Prince Asbo curated session on Exotic Pylon scheduled for Friday 4th November from 2 to 4pm. This exclusive mix features many songs actually mentioned in Thrifty Vinyl posts! EP’s Jonny Mugwump is a busy guy so you will want to keep up to date at Exotic Pylon to make sure the thing comes off.

If you have other obligations between 2 and 4, you can download the broadcast shortly after it’s, uh, broadcast right he-ah.

Published in: on November 1, 2011 at 10:00 am  Comments (4)